The Search for Mushrooms

We talked with fungi expert Kevin Sadlier about where to find some species in Marin, as well as the best times to go out and what to do with your finds.

Sure, the rains have been alleviating the drought and giving our cars a free wash, but they’ve also been helping mushrooms grow throughout the county. Interested in foraging? We talked with fungi expert Kevin Sadlier about where to find some species in Marin, as well as the best times to go out and what to do with your finds. Just remember: many mushrooms are poisonous. Before consuming anything foraged, consult an expert or bring your haul to the Mill Valley Public Library on the second Wednesday of the month, when the Mycological Society of Marin meets.

Chantelle

Season:

Almost year-round, with enough precipitation

Grows Near:

Fir, tan oak

Culinary Uses:

Sauté in butter with garlic and thyme.

Candy Cap

Season:

December to late January

Grows Near:

Tan Oak, pine (often near chanterelles)

Culinary Uses:

Can be dried and made into a flour or used to flavor ice cream.

Black Trumpet

Season:

January to early March

Grows Near:

Oak, mossy areas

Culinary Uses:

Adds a unique and tasty flavor o fritters.

Hedgehog

Season:

March to early April

Grows Near:

Bishop Pine

Culinary Uses:

Sauté in butter, goes well with pancetta.

Morel

Season:

April and May

Grows Near:

Mulch piles and recently burned areas

Culinary Uses:

Sauté in butter; great in soups and meat dishes.

This article originally appeared in Marin Magazine’s print edition under the headline: “Forage Forays“. 

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